A Wilson Times Co. publication · Serving Southern Nash County Since 1947

Nash County Sheriff's Office promotes Eddie Moore to major

Thank you for being one of our most loyal readers. Please consider supporting community journalism by subscribing.

Posted

NASHVILLE — The Nash County Sheriff’s Office has a new major.

Eddie Moore has been promoted to fill the position left open by a retiring David Brake.

Moore is a 21-year law enforcement officer who has been with the sheriff’s office for nearly two decades. He’s worked in various capacities during his tenure, including the patrol division, several years as part of the K-9 unit and in the staff services division. He previously held the rank of captain. 

Moore spearheaded several projects, including the implementation of body cameras, laptop computers, social media platforms and other technology-related software systems aimed at streamlining the agency’s processes. 

Brake retired at the end of April, drawing to a close a 30-year career in law enforcement. He spent several years at the N.C. Department of Corrections before moving to the sheriff’s office, where he’s worked for 18 years.

Brake is also a Marine Corps veteran who logged several years of military service before entering law enforcement. 

“David Brake was always a calm voice in tough times, and was always a people person,” said Chief Deputy Brandon Medina. “He had a great rapport with everyone he met. He will be truly missed at the sheriff’s office.” 

Brake plans to spend more time with his wife and his grandchild.

When not at work, Moore enjoys spending time with his family and riding his motorcycle.

Moore earned a Bachelor of Science degree in criminal justice from North Carolina Wesleyan College as well as a Master of Science in management and leadership from Montreat College. Moore is a graduate of the Coastal Plains Management Institute in Wilson and a graduate of the Administrative Officers Management Program through N.C. State University. Moore has achieved the Advanced Law Enforcement Certificate through the North Carolina Sheriffs’ Training and Standards Commission, which is the state’s highest professional certificate for working law enforcement officers.

Moore also has a general instructor certification and is a Taser and OC spray instructor. He regularly teaches state-commission-mandated topics to Basic Law Enforcement Training students with the goal of providing a solid background in the fundamentals of law, procedures and techniques necessary for success as a law enforcement officer.

Moore has been recognized by twice as Deputy of the Year, once in 2010 and again in 2015. 

Comments